SouthWest Florida’s Premier Fishing Guide

 

Snook Fishing in Southwest Florida

snook fishing in sw florida Experience the challenge of catching Florida’s most sought after gamefish. Fly fishing or spin, the snook will test an angler’s skill with their explosive strikes and gill rattling jumps.
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Redfishing in Southwest Florida

Captain Ken ChambersTangle with hard fighting redfish in the shallow bays of the 10,000 Islands. As they feed on small crabs and minnows, they become easy targets for a well placed fly or lure.
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Tarpon Fishing in Southwest Florida

tarpon fishingCome battle with the silver king. Spring migrations can bring tarpon well over 100 lbs. Baby tarpon are found year round with summer and fall being the prime time for these fish ranging 5-50 lbs.
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Fly Fishing in Southwest Florida

fly reel

Presenting flies to hard fighting snook, redfish and tarpon is the pinnacle of fly fishing the area. 7-9 weight rods are preferred for backcountry action. 11-12 weights are suitable for big tarpon.

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Trip and Rate Information
redfishing in southwest floridaLook inside for answers to frequently asked questions. Also, find out what you should bring on a trip and where we will meet for your fishing trip.
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Meet the Captain
fishing trip informationWelcome, to my website. I am Ken Chambers and I grew up fishing in Southwest Florida. As a full time guide and tournament angler, I probably spend as much time on a boat as I do off of it...
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My Fishing Reports

fishing reportBrowse through my latest fishing reports. Read about other anglers’ fishing tales and get recent updates of what, when and where the fish are biting.
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Contact Information

Capt. Ken Chambers
7908 Leicester Drive  Naples, FL 34104
Cell: 1-239-289-0984
Fax:
1-239-348-3477

EMAIL ME: CaptKenChambers@aol.com

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SOUTHWEST FLORIDA FISHING REPORTS - ARCHIVED
January 12 th , 2005

The weather in SW Florida has been fantastic. Actually, this guide likes the conditions to be slightly cooler but I am not complaining. Highs in the mid to high 70’s this week have been very comfortable.

 The fishing has been good to excellent depending on the tidal flow. During a strong incoming tide the fishing has been on fire. Snook, redfish, trout, and even a few small tarpon have all been actively taking flies and jigs tipped with shrimp. Downsizing to a #4 clouser minnow or dark colored shrimp fly has been the ticket. I like to use small bucktails when spin casting. Redfish are cruising back bays and outer points looking for a meal. The snook are not actively feeding but a well placed cast has produced a happy angler.

 The trout fishing is absurd lately. Easily catching limits on the outside if the winds permit. Otherwise the deeper troughs around the islands are holding plenty of these tasty fish. Jacks, ladyfish, mackerel, and some bluefish can also be found on the moving tides.

 For the month of January, the fishing has been good. Obviously, I can’t be too excited because any major front could ruin what has been going on but I have my fingers crossed.

November 22nd, 2005

Transitional months can be tough. One day the bite is on and the next, the whole gulf seems to be at a stand still.

 The fall bait run seems to have come and gone without much excitement. Sure there are days when fish are found gorging on baits but with cold fronts now coming through regularly, the season will be changing from baitfish and streamers to jigs and crab patterns.

 Recently, we have been catching lots of Spanish mackerel, ladyfish, trout, and jacks off the beaches. Any jig, spoon, or flashy fly has worked for these hungry critters.

 With the bait washing in to the beaches, there were tarpon, redfish, snook, and more right along the new structure formed by Hurricane Wilma. Speaking of new structure, the backcountry looks like a mangrove minefield with broken trees everywhere on the shallow flats.

 I am looking forward to the cooler season this year because the waters really clear up and the sightfishing in the backcountry for snook and redfish was excellent last year. Hopefully, they will be crashing the Kwan fly as in the past.

November 11th, 2005

Transitional months can be tough. One day the bite is on and the next, the whole gulf seems to be at a stand still.

 The fall bait run seems to have come and gone without much excitement. Sure there are days when fish are found gorging on baits but with cold fronts now coming through regularly, the season will be changing from baitfish and streamers to jigs and crab patterns.

 Recently, we have been catching lots of Spanish mackerel, ladyfish, trout, and jacks off the beaches. Any jig, spoon, or flashy fly has worked for these hungry critters.

 With the bait washing in to the beaches, there were tarpon, redfish, snook, and more right along the new structure formed by Hurricane Wilma. Speaking of new structure, the backcountry looks like a mangrove minefield with broken trees everywhere on the shallow flats.

 I am looking forward to the cooler season this year because the waters really clear up and the sightfishing in the backcountry for snook and redfish was excellent last year. Hopefully, they will be crashing the Kwan fly as in the past.

October 11th , 2005

We are in the transition from summer to fall on the water. This morning had a crisp feel to it. The days are hot and the fish seem to be moving into the backcountry.

The wind has been howling and the water is quite dirty in most areas do to some recent rains but the fish are hungry. Snook, redfish, and baby tarpon have been willing to eat. I have been fly fishing for the most part and when we find a clear shoreline, snook and reds can be sight fished. The toughest part of the day is just finding that cleaner water.

Olin and Evelyn Bryant spent the past couple of days casting flies. Olin caught several redfish, snook, and jacks. The highlight of the trip was the baby tarpon that we found rolling in a backcountry creek.  We had 9 fish eat the EP Hot Minnow fly ranging 5-15 lbs. I have spent many days this fall chasing tarpon in the creeks but I found it funny how today the stars were aligned and not only did we find them but they all seemed to be hungry.  If Olin wanted to he probably could have hooked over 20 fish.

Baitfish have been a challenge to find. Dirty water and wind make the cast netting a well full of bait a pain. When I can get my hands on some, the fish are chewing. Hopefully the winds may lay down a bit so the milky water will clear up.

September 18th , 2005

The fall fishing is upon us with hot temps and hurricanes coming near every week. The passes are loaded with tiny bait in the Everglades National Park. Red tide has been a nuisance to the north so I have spent most of my time south. Hungry snook and redfish are dominating the action with some tarpon hanging just off the beaches and in the backcountry creeks.

Fishing flies we caught numerous snook, redfish, and jacks over two days of inclement weather. Most of the fish were caught on EP minnows in brown or black. These are my go to colors when the rains stain our water to a tea color.

Live bait fishing is decent right now with schools of reds and a few snook pounding shiners cast along points near the outside.

This is a good time to use circle hooks when live baiting. Light wire circle hooks will increase your catch and they do much less damage to the fish. The design of the hook allows it to catch in the corner of the mouth most of the time. My anglers miss less snook and we can safely release the ones they don’t plan on keeping.

July 26 th, 2005

Super hot days have overshadowed the fishing lately. There have been some nice catches along with some lame days with the tides having a major impact right now. Strong moving water will turn the bite on but slower tides and high water temps provides us time to discuss our life stories.

When the midday heat comes in July, it is time to head for the dock. I have been doing plenty of morning trips and also have had luck fishing the late afternoon hours. Those summertime falling tides always seem to be real fishy.

Recently, Terry King caught several snook and had shots at many more on low tides near Round Key. Scott King and his brother Todd, both caught snook and tarpon after a recent storm. As the rains subside, the fresh water begins flowing out of the glades and the fish can become ravenous.

Other trips lately have provided grouper and tons of snapper. If you want to fill a cooler with these tasty critters, July may be the prime month of the year in the backcountry. Not huge fish but feisty and great in the pan.

Speaking of storms. Thankfully there is not a named storm in the area right now. Seems strange this year to not hear the news channels fretting over the direction of the next haymaker.

Hopefully we can have a calm month of August.

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